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Could anyone provide me with pointers on an elevator pitch?

Veteran

christina martinson Clarksville, TN

I am currently transitioning out and switching fields from medical to information technology. I hold a secret clearance and a 4 year bachelor degree.

21 May 2019 6 replies Interviews

Answers

Advisor

Tim Feemster Dallas, TX

Good advice from Mark. I would look back in your career and see if you have a story about implementation of an IT system while you were in the medical field and how your background assisted in the implementation or how your new knowledge would have helped. You want to carry that same "process" into the new company but with new skills.

22 May 2019 Helpful answer

Veteran

Philip Ayles Steilacoom, WA

The elevator pitch is your commercial of who you are and what you can do to solve problems. It is the broader concern of getting someone interested in your abilities and talents. Think about how you want to meet the professional organization you want to be a part of. Tailor your response to be concise within a 30 sec time frame. Hit the key points to make you stand out from the crowd.

Draw their interests and leave them wanting to know more about you. Networking as much as possible will undoubtedly give you the confidence to articulate your insights.

Conduct informational interviews with the decision makers of the organization. Make sure you treat everyone you interact with using kindness.

Phil

Veteran

Philip Ayles Steilacoom, WA

The elevator pitch is your commercial of who you are and what you can do to solve problems. It is the broader concern of getting someone interested in your abilities and talents. Think about how you want to meet the professional organization you want to be a part of. Tailor your response to be concise within a 30 sec time frame. Hit the key points to make you stand out from the crowd.

Draw their interests and leave them wanting to know more about you. Networking as much as possible will undoubtedly give you the confidence to articulate your insights.

Conduct informational interviews with the decision makers of the organization. Make sure you treat everyone you interact with using kindness.

Phil

Advisor

Susana Moraga Hayward, CA

Christiana,
You've received some good pointers, what's most important is first what will catch their attention and make them want to listen.
Depending upon your circumstances just like a resume, you should have a few at hand since you are in a job search mode.
Good luck,

Advisor

Jeanne Perdue Houston, TX

Networking Event self-introduction example:
"Hi, I'm Christina Martinson. I've served in the Army for four years and have a secret clearance. I am transitioning from the medical field to information technology, and I'm looking for ways that digitalization can save consumers billions of dollars in health care costs, which is the number one cause of personal bankruptcy."

Advisor

Mark Medaglia Southington, CT

Hi Christina,

Honestly, that depends on whether you are pitching yourself or an idea. In general, both should be short and stick to the facts.

With an idea pitch, I've found success by distilling the idea down to 2 sentences that consist of what the idea is, and why its beneficial to the company you are working for or the individual you are speaking with. From there, you can flesh it out to 3-5 Sentences, but keep it succinct. Really focus on the why its beneficial using facts. Depending on your comfort level, you may want to practice until you know it by heart.

If you are pitching yourself, I've found success by introducing myself with name and title. I'll typically continue with what my specialties are and something I'm working on currently that is germane to the person I'm interacting with. From there, I typically ask a question. That question is either related to something I know they are working on (you might need to do a little research) or is a bit more opened ended (I.E. asking them what they are working on).

I've found the best way to walk away with the other person saying, "Hey, lets talk further." is to make a real connection. You likely won't "impress" someone with an elevator pitch, but that's not your goal. You're goal is to get to a point where you can continue the conversation at a later date.

I hope this helps.

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