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What does "military friendly" mean exactly?

Veteran

Jason Kugel Yulee, FL

I love USAA. Great company to be a customer/client with. They're military friendly. There are at least 100 you can find in a simple list format just by Google searches. Here's what I'm finding- they are more than willing to bring you into the fold if you have at least a Bachelor's degree. They're happy to bring you in at minimum wage (give or take a few bucks). But without fail, if I look into supervisor and managerial roles, there is always a requirement I just don't see how a vet could POSSIBLY have. How am I going to already be licensed to sell insurance or financial services? How am I going to have experience in "Debit Card Dispute Resolution"? Here's the thing- give me a week or two of OJT, and I'm good to go. Offer me a job where I can learn the ropes while I get my License or Certification you want. Nearly every vet has supervisory/ managerial experience and that experience is gained in different roles, locations, and often under conditions NO civilian has faced. We get things done. Tell a Deck Seaman you want a bonfire built "right here". If all he has is clothes and a lighter, when you check on him you're gonna see a naked kid with a big fire right where you wanted it.
Here's the catch 22- I can't afford to get certified as a broker and then apply to a financial advisor or wealth manager position, and NOT like the work once I'm in. Now, I get why CSX and others require "at least a bachelor's" to get into a Manager Development Program with them. Even that though, are you going to tell me that after 21 years of being able to accomplish any task and supervise the folks needed to do it, that a Bachelor's makes me better at it? Or that I can't "learn the specifics" of a business unless I've completed a 4 year degree? Where is the Military Friendliness, if they don't appear to understand the basic premise of "I can do that" and learn specifics on the fly?

2 March 2014 7 replies Career Exploration

Answers

Veteran

Jason Kugel Yulee, FL

Words can't describe how glad I am to have found this website. Every time I post a question, I get educated by every answer.
Mr. Damin- I loved your remark about how if I meet every requirement, I'm overqualified. Goes right along with "If you're the smartest person in the room, you're in the wrong room" Unless you're a teacher I guess. Thanks!
Ms.Guiness- I really appreciate the pro advice on my profile. I will fix it tonight. I'm also going to take a closer look at the oil industry, I've looked at the companies, but always in a "how does my security experience work for me?" capacity.
Mr. Cliff- Your Chief's quote just proves how smart Chiefs are. Truer words may never be uttered. I didn't know about SCORE, and will look into that on Tuesday (it's after 5 right now.) And thanks for sailor-proofing it for me and adding the contact info- now I can't make the excuse I don't feel like looking them up!! I really appreciate your input!
Regards,
Jason

3 March 2014 Helpful answer

Advisor

Cliff Sullivan Largo, FL

Dear Chief Kugel,
I know just what you are saying. On two Antarctic Expeditions,(Electrician's Mate) aboard the U.S.S. Glacier, AGB-4, our Chief would always tell us, "The only things that can't be fixed, are the crack of dawn, and a broken heart! Get to work."

It's never too late to obtain your college degree. I'm 72, and LAST YEAR graduated from Southern New Hampshire University, using on-line classes. They are the largest in the country.
You could get "started" with a few courses, and add that to your resume. I'm "working on my MBA".

In my past, I've been a licensed broker for Property & Casualty, Life Accident & Health, and Securities. There are many opportunities for you to become an Independent Insurance Agent.
One of my current associates, Glen Fischer, 26 years military, glen@mbahro.com, is with Modern Business Associates, http://www.mbahro.com/. There are many ways to put your vast Navy experience to good use...you may just need a little more "Due Diligence".

Why don't you contact the SCORE Chapter near you? SCORE is a non-profit resource of the U.S. Small Business Administration, staffed by industry veterans willing to "Pay It Forward" by volunteering their time and expertise mentoring new and existing business owners along their pathway to business success.
www.score.org

Counseling for Small Businesses
21 mile(s)
3 Independent Drive Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce
Jacksonville, FL 32202
Phone: (904) 443-1900
Directions | Contact | Request a mentor
2
North Central Florida SCORE
80 mile(s)
101 SE 2nd Place, Suite #104
Gainesville, FL 32601
Phone: (352) 375-8278
Directions | Contact | Request a mentor
3
Savannah SCORE
104 mile(s)
111 E. Liberty Street Suite 103
Savannah, GA 31401
Phone: (912) 652-4335

3 March 2014 Helpful answer

Advisor

Guinness Collins Magnolia, TX

Jason, it is quite ironic that many companies with chief executive officers that barely finished high school now require their employees to have at minimum a Bachelor's degree and always have 'Masters preferred'. While I do not deny that a degree can open doors, you may find that your search is a little more of a climb by not having one. However, not entirely unobtainable. Your networking and elevator speech about you has to be top notch. Here are some quick notes
1. Your Linked in profile page for networking is good, but could be better. Use a professional headshot, not a snapshot or 'cutesy' fmaily shot. LinkedIn is a great way to network with like minded professionals.
2. If using LinkedIn for networking, remove you first paragraph regarding your wife and the words 'if' I came to that first off and immediatley drew back. Luckily I kept reading, some will not.here is a quote from a headhunter that I really like, ' any savvy job seeker in this current employment market knows that blindly applying for jobs using your resume is a recipe for a long bout of unemployment. Generally accepted statisitcs demonstrate that only 20% of all jobs are filled via job boards and newspaper ads. And of that 20% the majority of the time the hiring manager knows who they want to hire before the posting goes up. The other 80% of jobs are filled through networking with friends, family, current or former co-workers, or through extended professional networking through LinkedIn and other professional organizations.'
3. Use your 21 years of experience and network that out. Finding a position within those professionals just like you, who have gone into high end security work is always a start.
4. Have you looked at places such as Midland/Odessa Texas area for work? Companies (oil related) out there have a severe shortage of employees. I was out there last week and it is amazing how many companies cannot find employees. Or Even in the Dakotas also, oil companies that are paying well and with your 21 years experience it may be the step in order to finish out your degree long term.
Best of luck.
Guinness

3 March 2014 Helpful answer

Advisor

Damin Kirk Hazelwood, MO

Hi Jason,

I agree 100% with Phil and you. It's hard to believe that education is weighted so heavily, but there any a trillion reasons why. You already have the experience, a degree to seals the deal. Most high paying jobs require a degree, and all the degree does is validate what you've accomplished (I know, doesn't make sense). That's just how it is. Look at it like this...with all of the education benefits you have. Why wouldn't you have or go get your degree? Try answering that question in an interview.

So my advice, would be finish your degree, you won't regret it, I promise. Also, zero in on your strongest interest and determine what skills you have. You don't have to satisfy every job requirement of a job post, if you have at least half of what they're asking for, you can do the job. If you meet every requirement to a T, you're overqualified. Good Luck!

Damin

3 March 2014 Helpful answer

Veteran

Jason Kugel Yulee, FL

I plan on going back soon, I've just been trying to put a full court press on this job hunting, hoping something would come up and then work school into it. With my luck, I start school and physically attend classes (versus online coursework) and then a job will come up and I won't be able to go to school. I have an AAS in Criminal Justice, and plan on getting a Bachelor's in something like Business Management or heading straight for Computer Science and certs in IT systems security. I also plan on trying to get PMP certified. Unfortunately, most of the aircraft jobs I see are based on the H60 platform and/or require "recent" aviation experience within the last 3 years. You're right on point with your assessments in your response, and I appreciate it.
Thanks for taking the time to answer my question Mr. Phil.

3 March 2014 Helpful answer

Advisor

Phil C. Fort Worth, TX

Jason,

As a fellow veteran, I feel your pain. It is disgraceful, disrespectful and dishonorable how companies will claim they are veteran friendly, but actuality are not. To ignore someone who has a mountain of skills, directly related to the field, because they do not have a college degree is a travesty. The same individuals who ignore skilled veterans because they do not have college degrees will be the same people who complain about the poor quality of education academia is giving the new-grads they hire and fire. This might not be what you're wanting to hear, but Jason, I would recommend you go to college. Here is why:

1.) Someone with your background, maturity, and mental toughness will get way more out of their college experience than a 22 year-old kid who has never been out in the world and is taken care of by mommy and daddy.

2.) Chief Kugel, with his college degree, will get promoted faster which will make up the difference in seniority and compensation. This will not be based on how he looks on paper, but how he conducts himself on the job. Your future employer will be getting a seasoned leader and team player from day one. With the new-hires, this will take many years and perhaps decades to instill.

3.) Going into academia, Jason, you will be afforded the ability to lead and impart positive change amongst fellow military veterans and give the "institution" a dose of reality it has never had before. This will help shrink the gap in disparity between universities and the business world. You will have the opportunity to leave a legacy that helps make the warrior's transition less of a culture shock. This will have a ripple effect.

However, college is not for everyone and I would still recommend some training or certification program. There are actual, veteran friendly companies out there that can use your talents, but they are going to be more related to aerospace and defense. Check out there websites and see what kind of jobs they are offering. Many of them could really use your aircraft electrician background.

Veteran

Jason Kugel Yulee, FL

I just went from this page, https://www.veteranjobsmission.com/tips-and-resources/educational-tips to the link for this page http://global.sap.com/corporate-en/sustainability/index.epx

Nothing about veterans at all. In fact, typing "veterans" into their search app returned "nothing found on veterans"

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