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Employee Value Propositions

Veteran

Shana Thompson Kissimmee, FL

In a recent meeting with our Human Resource Management Collegiate Association president, she asked me if I had an employee value proposition or some sort of outline of what I have to offer a company I want to work for. I didn't but my wheels have turned nonstop day and night on the desire to put together one. I'm curious-Do any of you all have any such thing drawn out? I assume this would not be static...as a resume isn't either, but a living changing document.
I'm also curious-Have any of you ever created a vision for your professional endeavors that is not tied to an organization (as a ceo or chro) or your personal life vision?

16 November 2020 10 replies General

Answers

Advisor

Gusanita Roberson Mableton, GA

Hi Shana,
Nice to meet you. I would begin creating a personal value proposition by inventorying your strengths, accomplishments and experiences. After you create your list, consult with trusted friends and advisors who have observed your professionally and ask them to provide your with what the consider as your professional strengths. From this self-reflection and external input, you can develop "Shana's story".

16 November 2020 Helpful answer

Advisor

Tim Keeley New York, NY

Shana, your query recalls the classic interviewer statement: "So, tell me about yourself."
Leaving aside that this may be a stalling tactic by someone who has barely scanned your resume, let's look at it as an opportunity. As a 'value proposition,' you might emphasize your burning curiosity, desire to be a lifelong learner. As an example, I did my military service in [logistics, radio communications; etc.] but I have invested in human resources skills because I see people as the transformative vehicle for a company's success. I believe in personal reinvention, and I am confident I can help others do the same...' If you reflect thoughtfully, your core value proposition should not change much through time, even if your career aspirations drive you to new heights. Make sense?

16 November 2020 Helpful answer

Advisor

Frank Cristinzio Washington, DC

Hello Shana - thanks for your service. I echo Tim's comment.

I have always found it helpful to reflect and write out honest answers to common interview questions related to that "value proposition". Identify your core principles and what you want to do - then translate link to resume bullets interview question answers. For example - if it is important to you to elevate the performance of team mates, write out your story on the skills you have and the examples of past success - and how they translate into the job you are seeking. I have always gotten a long way by being able to explain technical topics to non-technical people. I summarize my personal mission "Help government use technology to accomplish the mission" and describe what I strive for each day to do that: building teams, building networks, projecting points of view etc. Maybe you want to "help leading organization's build teams that can solve problems of tomorrow" and then list the skills you have to do that, and why YOU are the right fit for their organization.

Will also give a piece of advice I echo to everyone. Go on LinkedIn and look at a lot of profiles of people that work in your desired field and have the job you want. See how they frame their value proposition and use their example to make your personal profile better.

Thanks again for serving. Good luck with your transition. Hope this is helpful.

16 November 2020 Helpful answer

Advisor

Tim Olson Port Orchard, WA

Hi Shana, I'd recommend to you the same book I've given to all my children and use with my mentees called Designing Your Life - How to Build a Well-Lived, Joyful Life by Burnett and Evans. The authors (Stanford professors) use the same problem solving technique with their students that IBM uses with its clients (Design Thinking) and apply it to designing your life. Each chapter of the book has some exercises that lead you progressively through various design-oriented problem-solving techniques all geared towards helping you identify work areas that interest you and how to explore them.

16 November 2020 Helpful answer

Advisor

Denise Stonsby Mount Kisco, NY

Hi Shana - thanks for your service. Another resource you can check out is Simon Sinek - "what's your why" - he's got a short youtube video (all his stuff is great), that may help with addressing this. As to your last question - someone once gave me great advice "do not define yourself by where you work but by what you do". So when you get the question of "tell me about yourself" start with your top 3 qualities; not "I was a military X"; Good luck; hope this helps.

16 November 2020 Helpful answer

Veteran

Shana Thompson Kissimmee, FL

I like it Gusanita! Develop Shana's story. Thank you!

Patrice, nice to meet you! After I define personal value prop, seek a company that is a good fit in terms of values. Thanks 😊

Advisor

Patrice Scully Mahwah, NJ

Hi Shana,
Thank you for your service. I see you have a lot of good advice so far. One thing I would like to add is once you defined your personal value proposition you might use it to help pick companies that are a good fit. For example does the company encourage volunteering, care about the environment, have mentoring in place for new employees or veterans, etc. If you find a company that fits your personal value proposition you can state in the interview why you are a good fit for the company.

Veteran

Shana Thompson Kissimmee, FL

I follow your formula with developing a vision and mission for myself Frank. Very nice. I'll also take a closer look at my LinkedIn connects and people I follow to get a better understanding of how other professionals in my field frame themselves.

Tim O., I have saved your recommended reading to my Amazon cart to review and read--as soon as classes are over for turkey day break I am reading it :). It sounds like a great investment for myself and my family.

Thank you both!

Veteran

Shana Thompson Kissimmee, FL

Hi Tim, thank you so much for you insights. My takeaway is that I have some careful thought and consideration to do!

Hi Denise, I've seen Simon's talks but not this one on starting with the why. Watching it now..

Both of your responses and advice are food for thought and action :)

Veteran

Shana Thompson Kissimmee, FL

Nice to 'meet' you Tim and yes, I understand and this will contribute greatly to my journey.

Thank you!

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