Please upgrade your web browser

These pages are built with modern web browsers in mind, and are not optimized for Internet Explorer 8 or below. Please try using another web browser, such as Internet Explorer 9, Internet Explorer 10, Internet Explorer 11, Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, or Apple Safari.

AdvisorNet

Wannabe Chief Marketing Officer, Banker, or Consultant... Need help narrowing down a path!

Veteran

Evan Moinvaziri Philadelphia, PA

I love the idea of marketing on a global level, however, I cannot stand the idea of marketing on a lower level... The job market is saturated with scam-like marketing agencies hiring for dimes and commission. I want to be involved in refining, developing and delivering products to new and existing markets for fortune 100 companies. I am also interested in M&A. The idea of proposing companies and working on large projects that impact the future of companies and in the end create new possibilities for consumers. I love the idea of an economic impact both marketing and mergers and acquisitions pose. The interest in consulting comes from not knowing if it is something that could knock both of these birds out with one stone?

I would love some positive insight with someone who has experience or knowledge in a similar predicament or field of business.

9 February 2019 5 replies Career Exploration

Answers

Advisor

Joseph (Joe) Valicevic Mount Pleasant, MI

Evan - First and foremost, I want to thank you for your service to our country. Second, I believe a banking career could provide opportunities to learn and participate in M&A opportunities especially for companies reliant on Commercial Banks for financing their acquisitions.

In my career as a Commercial Banker, I have seen many business graduates come into entry level positions as Credit Analysts and successfully learn to evaluate the performance of operating companies, which is so fundamental to buying and selling businesses. This is a great education and gives wonderful insight into how companies achieve success or why they fail.

Once you have achieved success in the role of a Credit Analyst for a 3 - 5 year period, a promotion to a position as a Commercial Banker may be possible and, with your institution's blessing, would give you opportunities for financing acquisitions for clients who desire to grow through acquisition as opposed to organically. Financing acquisitions for clients for many mid sized banks has been very lucrative and offers bankers a great way to see the sale/acquisition process up close.

Opportunities are there to get credit trained working in a Commercial Bank environment. Usually candidates who have been successful academically in college, had opportunities to intern in a bank and have taken accounting and/or finance courses are most ideal for these opportunities. Many Bankers who have had success financing acquisitions for their clients are often attracted to the work and will pursue lucrative careers outside of banking working for PE companies.

Let me know if you would like to chat further. Joe

Advisor

Joseph (Joe) Valicevic Mount Pleasant, MI

Evan - First and foremost, I want to thank you for your service to our country. Second, I believe a banking career could provide opportunities to learn and participate in M&A opportunities especially for companies reliant on Commercial Banks for financing their acquisitions.

In my career as a Commercial Banker, I have seen many business graduates come into entry level positions as Credit Analysts and successfully learn to evaluate the performance of operating companies, which is so fundamental to buying and selling businesses. This is a great education and gives wonderful insight into how companies achieve success or why they fail.

Once you have achieved success in the role of a Credit Analyst for a 3 - 5 year period, a promotion to a position as a Commercial Banker may be possible and, with your institution's blessing, would give you opportunities for financing acquisitions for clients who desire to grow through acquisition as opposed to organically. Financing acquisitions for clients for many mid sized banks has been very lucrative and offers bankers a great way to see the sale/acquisition process up close.

Opportunities are there to get credit trained working in a Commercial Bank environment. Usually candidates who have been successful academically in college, had opportunities to intern in a bank and have taken accounting and/or finance courses are most ideal for these opportunities. Many Bankers who have had success financing acquisitions for their clients are often attracted to the work and will pursue lucrative careers outside of banking working for PE companies.

Let me know if you would like to chat further. Joe

Advisor

Sam Hoffman Roslyn Heights, NY

Hi Evan,
Adjusting to the idea of "you're here to make money," is the hardest thing for most of the vets I know. The positions you're talking about, and the employees that companies send around the world to trade fairs and expos are the money makers. International business is not all glamour. When a company sends you overseas to do business, they will expect you to not come back empty-handed.
From your post I gather you would not be happy in a marketing role. My rec to you is to get a CPA or law degree, so you can get into management sideways rather than from the bottom of a marketing career track. This is especially true of banking or consulting.
If you'd like to talk, please message me, I'll give you my phone number. Forum is not the best place to make career decisions :D

Advisor

Paul Tusting Salt Lake City, UT

Great advice from Jai.

1) When a consultant is hired, the expectation is that they are already an expert and will hit the ground running. That will come with time.

2) As far as M&A, the ones I have observed from the sidelines, first involve a very broad understanding of the companies in play to figure out a deal structure and valuation. Then once at the Letter of Intent (LOI) point, very very very detailed understanding of the parameters in play to do the due diligence to close the deal. From your description, it sounds like you may be more drawn to "Tech Transfer" (just do a google search if that is a new term to you) than true M&A. The limited data points I've seen for people coming up in M&A, they either come from finance or sales/marketing background, but in either case they had a lot of experience before moving into a M&A role (but this was all related to small businesses of <500 employees).

3) As far as marketing, I'd look at Jai's suggestions on how to get into it. The big takeaway is looking for environments to interact with people with experience in the field (traditional school or other training, conferences, internships, and/or I think there is a section of ACP that can match you with a mentor.). I'd also check out score.org.

Best of Luck!
-Paul

Advisor

Jai Chotalia Hermosa Beach, CA

Evan, thank you for the ten years of service to our country and its people!

The answer to the question you seek isn't quite as straight forward. You're on the right path with enlightening yourself with your Marketing degree. Info I'm sure you already know: read as much as you can on AdAge, be a part of conferences & conventions, read/write as many white papers as you can! With information & insight, differentiate yourself from herd. FYI - Marketing spend for tech companies on the west coast is ever increasing!

Also, try to narrow your path is it a) marketing or is it b) M&A? Companies tend to hire experienced folks in a given niche - they will pay you quality sums of money if you are an expert in 'a' or 'b'. Consulting comes later down the road once your an expert with many years of work experience @ a higher level pay grade / strategy level. They are generally experts in a field that a company hires to solve an internal problem.

In my career, I've supported many marketing leaders @ Toyota & Disney, albeit from a Sourcing perspective, who have their finger on the pulse on different types of marketing as well as targeted marketing plans for their unique customer base. I've approached these leaders with an inquisitive nature and by asking them to be my mentors - they can in turn help guide your career to where you want to go!

I hear the drive and energy in your voice - I wish you the VERY best...happy to chat more - feel free to email!
Jai

Your Answer

Please log in to answer this question.

Sign Up

You can join as either a Veteran or an Advisor.

An Advisor already has a career, with or without military experience, and is willing to engage with and help veterans.
Sign Up as an Advisor.

A Veteran has military experience and is seeking a new career, or assistance with life after service.
Sign Up as a Veteran.