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Is it ever too late to transition into certain industries?

Veteran

Timothy Piddington New York, NY

Hi,

Is it ever too late to transition into certain industries?

15 November 2018 5 replies Career Exploration

Answers

Advisor

Jason Bunyea Brownsboro, AL

Hi Timothy,

First, let me directly answer your question, "Is it ever too late to transition into certain industries?" In my opinion, the simple answer is "No." If you want to transition into Data Analytics, you certainly are able. It's just a question of how much you have to do to get your start in the new field.

More to the point, John is correct, there's going to be a lot of variance in how organizations define fields like Data Analytics. Some organizations are still performing analysis with database queries, Excel sheets, semi-automated processes, and a lot of human interpretation; other organizations, on the other hand, are leaning way out front the large neural networks and more data than a human can understand. Employees in both organizations might carry the title 'Data Analyst', but one can easily break into the former with self-taught skills, and the latter will probably some very specialized education.

Try to narrow down exactly what you're interested in, and, as John mentioned, start building your skills up from there.

Let me know if you have any more questions.

Jason

15 November 2018 Helpful answer

Veteran

Curtis Hays Castle Rock, CO

I've phone screened many applicants that say they want a change and are willing to do anything if I give them a chance. I never hire them unless they've demonstrated that their eagerness motivated them to do work prior to interviewing. For software developers, it could mean taking classes and doing after hours work creating something and publishing their code on github for others to review. For engineers, it could mean purchasing hobby equipment to exercise skills until the find the job they want. Some kind of proof that the motivation is moving you to do more than interview is the seasoning I look for in interviews.

15 November 2018 Helpful answer

Advisor

John Stammreich San Pedro, CA

Hello Timothy - my first bit of advice would be to find the ideal position you would want in one of the companies you would prefer to work, and see what they are requiring for that role. Most of the skills you are looking to perform require industry knowledge that you're going to have to gain on the job at a business engaged in that industry. For example, "research, data analytics or capital allocation" is done much differently at DHL Global Forwarding than it is at Yum Yum Brands (the parent of many of the fast food franchises we both go to.) Both companies would have a need for this, and both likely have entry level / junior manager positions in which you could apply to be brought in.

But I recommend also looking for the higher positions, if for anything, to see what experience they are requiring. Then, seek out the junior positions to those roles that will get you the experience you need. Use the "Required skills" or "Basic qualifications" section of those higher positions as a checklist for what you should seek out. Then get in the door somewhere and show them you're eager to get going!

Good Luck!

15 November 2018 Helpful answer

Advisor

Joe Pierce Jonesboro, AR

Hi Timothy
Thank you for your service.
The short answer is no. Many people change direction throughout their careers. However, the longer it takes you to settle into one career, the less time you have to build your career and to start making the higher salaries that come with senior levels

Veteran

Timothy Piddington New York, NY

Thank you for the feedback.

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