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How do I compete against internal job candidates?

Advisor

Jim Williams Fpo, AE

I have been on several job interviews where I performed well (based on feedback I received) and had the skills for the position, but each time I was beat out by an internal candidate. How can I compete with someone who is already established in the company I am interviewing with? Some people that I have talked to suggest that HR practices bring in outside candidates to interview just so they can show a pool of applicants had been interviewed while all along the intention was to hire the internal candidates. Is this a common practice and if so, how can I identify these practices up front?

19 January 2016 42 replies Interviews

Answers

Advisor

John Green Cary, NC

Spell checking will always improve your chances for getting an interview with your resume.

https://www.google.com/search?q=candidate

Candidate spelled wrong three times in the above paragraph. Are there other misses in your resume document ? Plus x4 for the headline.

Surprised no one else mentioned it.

Also 'indentify' is not correct, did you mean 'identify' ?

If your resume is fraught with misspellings , you may be loosing out to people who have better spelling habits rather than your assumed root cause of internal candidates. People judge you by the words you use, and if your chosen words are not spelled correctly, then your chances are slim or none.

http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/spelling-and-word-lists/misspelled.html

20 January 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

Pamela Coric Oxford, AL

Hi Jim,

Thank you for your service. Wow you have been given some great feedback here! I would just add one thing. Tell the interview panel "If you decide to hire from within, please count me in for the opening that will need to be filled due to the internal candidate's promotion." By doing this you let them know you are a go-getter and eager to work for them. And sell yourself, be proactive. get excited, tell them why they need to hire you?

Also, on www.usa.jobs, military folks get the preferential treatment. They must offer the job to someone with military experience first.

Good luck,

Pam Coric

1 February 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

Steven Betts Houston, TX

Jim, there is a lot of good advice above. The best answer to your question, in my opinion, is Doug Hill's first post. To add to his post, if a company does business with the Federal government, the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) has the most stringent requirements for interviewing, and hiring, a workforce as diverse as the community they operate in, even if it makes little sense (the company I worked for was fined for not having enough women mechanics even though all that interviewed were offered a position.) That said, these companies must interview outside candidates even if they know they will hire an internal candidate. You will know this is the case if the company has contracts with the Federal Government.

That is not to say you should not consider an industry that works with the Federal Government as being a Veteran, you are considered a protected class and this might work to your advantage.

Thank you for your service, I hope you find this helpful.

29 January 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

Stacey Murphy Denville, NJ

Jim, thank you for your service and it sounds like with your years of experience and leadership you'll be a great asset to any company! I read all of these answers and they are all spot on - it IS hard to compete with an internal candidate, particularly if they have a shoe in person in mind. The "knowns" of an internal candidate often outweigh the unknowns of an external candidate. YET, the internal candidates have their shortcomings which are also known (Bob knows the job inside and out but will he be able to make the tough decisions, Pat has great customer relationships but drives the back office crazy). So there is rarely a perfect internal candidate.

So I'd like to tack onto Jim Schreier's comment. In a nutshell, underneath all the job descriptions and company blah blah, hiring managers really want one thing - they want their life (and the lives of those around them) to be easier. Maybe they've been doing the work of two people while the position has been vacant. Maybe the person who left had a lot of knowledge and they're struggling to work without it. Or maybe he/she was toxic and left a morale mess. So the hiring managers worry about things like a long learning curve, they want someone who will be able to fit in and be productive pretty quickly. They don't want complaints about the new guy from the 30 year employees (quite often current employees complain about new people coming in who don't value their expertise and tenure, or don't get to know the culture and way of doing things before they implement change). The manager wants his/her own life to be a bit less stressful, because they've had the position vacant for a while, or because there are new business challenges, or any other number of reasons. So what I'm suggesting is, think about the skills that you bring that might assuage some of these concerns preemptively - and highlight your successes at things like:
- coming into a new position and learning new information quickly
- being able to work with a lot of different personalities and age groups (younger folks, long term, etc)
- success at reaching out and building collaborative relationships (not just with your manager but deep into the team and with peers, business partners and stakeholders)
- caring about the team (helping with people's careers, their professional development) (here I'm assuming that you are pursuing leadership roles)
In the interview, show interest in the organization (how have folks been managing through the vacant position? what does the team need most from the new person coming in? what types of people are most successful in this company culture?)

If you would like to chat further please message me or send me your resume and we can talk through some scenarios.
All the best! I know you will be successful,
Stacey

29 January 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

Jim Schreier Milwaukee, WI

There are some good points being provided but I think mine be a little different. Yes, there are benefits to promoting internally. It's considered good business to show current employees that they have these opportunities. But there is a much bigger issue. Think about this. What does an HR rep or Hiring Manager know about an internal candidate versus an external candidate? They clearly know much, much more about the internal candidate. They have detailed information about that person's performance, their accomplishments, their personality, their strengths, their weaknesses. What do they know about you, the external candidate? Only what you choose to tell them on your resume and maybe your LinkedIn profile. And that's often nothing more than experiences that are little more than lists of titles and boring job duties, combined with vague objective statements and lists of skills -- which really tell me nothing. Nothing about what you've done or what you can do.

To bring your candidacy near the level of internal candidates, you need to focus on your accomplishments -- what you've done, not what you have (skills, job titles). You need to be telling stories about your accomplishments, both in interviews and on your resume, that show your strengths, insights into your personality, and, of course, your team accomplishments.

25 January 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

Scott Fruchter San Bernardino, CA

Many times you can't. As mentioned above, the internal candidate will be selected in over 50% of the selections and you are only "window dressing". Employment is a numbers game. If two thirds of the interviews are weighted against you, then you must interview three times as often to succeed.

Emphasize things the internal candidate is unlikely to have: experience working with a wide range of people, willingness to work until the job is done, ability to see a strategic perspective, military discipline and responsibility, etc.

'

23 January 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

Jeff Sanders Deland, FL

I ran into the same thing in 1992. I was applying for USDA positions for which I was qualified, and I was a disabled veteran with 10 point preference. I soon learned that those with connections, or internal were getting the jobs. Are you mobile? Are you looking at government positions? I learned that I needed to lower my sights and apply for entry level positions. I also made an appointment and talked with the HR manager, also a DV. His first question was whether or not I was mobile for future positions. Although I had a family I told him I was willing to move wherever they needed me, anytime they needed me. Within a month I was offered a position, entry level, that wasn't even advertised. Things worked out well, and I went from a GS-4 to GS-13 in 9 years. So, three questions:
1) Are you willing to apply for a lower grade position for which you know you are over qualified?
2) Are you mobile, if the type of company, organization or government finds that a plus? It also increases the number of positions that you can apply for.
3) Have you scheduled an appointment with the HR manager to identify your goals and desires? While the HR manager may not have any direct hiring authority, they certainly know the right people to pass information along too, especially when someone is well qualified and sufficiently motivated. The appointment can be as simple as "I am....., and I am very interested in a position here, I was just wondering if you might tell me how to go about it when most positions seem to be filled by internal employees?" Be polite, direct, and grateful. I hope this helps and works for you. Good luck.

20 January 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

Lisanne Sison Sacramento, CA

I would also add that when you are competing against internal candidates, it is helpful to emphasize the benefits an organization gains from selecting external candidates (e.g. - the infusion of new ideas, ability to see inefficiencies where others just see habit, and experience with different approaches to common challenges.) Hiring from within may cause the least amount of disruption to the daily operations of an organization, but I would also argue that this "safe" choice does not help the organization move forward or expand their success as quickly as they would by strategically selecting external candidates that can help push them in new ways. The more you can sell this idea in the interview, the more you can differentiate yourself as a value creator in comparison to the other candidates. Good luck!

19 January 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

William Bahrt Sequim, WA

Chief Williams: Many companies have a policy of promoting from within and that is difficult to get around. However, it is a fact that over 60% if jobs are obtained through direct face-to-face contact with the hiring manager. That all important first impression can overcome a lot of hurdles that employers put there to screen out applicants. The use of a well memorized 30 second presentation can get the employer's attention in your favor and, if it is possible to overcome the in-house promotion philosophy, that will do it. Here's how it is done. First get a powerful two page resume that can be read easily. Second, research companies in your area that have a potential need for someone with your background. Third, do the research necessary to find out who is doing the hiring. Fourth, find a way to get to that person; often a simple request to speak to them will do it. Fifth, shake his or her hand, look them in the eye and say "I am looking for a job as a ________. I have. . . (and here you assertively state the main areas of your skill sets. No more than three.) You then say, I am . . . (Here you mention three or four character traits about you that would be important in the work place.) You then ask, "Do you have an opening for someone with my skills and abilities. Then, if they say they do, you set up an appointment for an interview. If they say the don't have such an opening you ask, "Do you know of someone who does?" If they don't, you might ask for advice on how to break into their company. But, as soon as possible if there are no possibilities there, leave. Don't waste their time or yours.

With this introduction, you will more than likely get a reaction. They are used to being approached with a question as to whether they are accepting applications. This goes about three notches higher that that. It is true that a lot of companies make you jump through hoops like sending your resume through a computerized technique. But if you can make a direct contact WITH THE HIRING MANAGER you can open doors that otherwise might be closed to you. Good luck with this, I hope it helps.

19 January 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

Abie Chong Mc Lean, VA

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SERVICE, MCPO! Lots of great inputs here--love what Pam Coric suggested. I will simply add, a company that develops its team members, educates, trains, and prepares them for positions of greater responsibilities, then promotes best qualified from within is not unlike the great organization you have served these many years--the USN. Civilian companies who interview a pool of internal and external applicants is looking for the best-qualified candidate.

18 August 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

James Corona Houston, TX

Jim,

Let's look at the opposite side of the coin. I have superb qualifications for a position I applied for "inside" my company and got passed over. I can speculate on the reasons for this; internal politics, fresh outside talent, top preferable administrator directives. Can we change destiny?

In your situation, having great qualifications is only part of the competitive process; resume, cover letter, and interview skills can increase the hiring probability but add also who you "know" internally. If you don't know anyone, I advise going to chamber of commerce industry business evening mixers and take several copies of your resume. Check out your local American Legion affiliation and mingle with your veteran peers to see what's out there in the job market. You will be surprised that older gentlemen know someone that knows someone with your qualifications! Relocating would be another consideration because the job market may be stalled or stagnant at your region.

17 August 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

Eric Ahlness Saint Paul, MN

I would further confirm that companies that consider internal candidates alongside external candidates are select the internal at a disproportional rate. 50-60% was cited above and I have also heard figures closer to 70% at some companies.

However, I would use the interview experience to further develop your skills and to learn more about the industries to which you are applying. Internal candidates have an inherent advantage since they are known and know the company. As you learn more about the industry and can align your skills and talents against the needs of the company you will likely be one of the external 30%+ selected.

29 January 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

E Y Cerritos, CA

It may seem challenging to compete with internal job candidates. To help you win a job position, I would recommend connecting with colleagues of yours who have entered civilian workforce via linkedin.com. They may be able to tell you of openings well in advance of advertisement to the public. They also can act as professional references on your resume. In addition, when we hire candidates we look at their linkedin profile just to get additional information. Therefore, a linkedin profile is highly recommended. May you get the job you seek!

28 January 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

Wade Robinson Great Falls, VA

Having led recruiting teams in government contracting for several years - there is one clue that may mean the employer has someone internal in mind for the position.

If the posting is listed as being open for a short period of time, say a week to 10 days - there is a good chance that the organization is operating within their stated policies, but would rather select an internal candidate.

26 January 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

Bob Molluro Wilmington, DE

Most people in any industry think + or - 10% to 15% like everyone else in that industry. It's worse in an individual company. People from outside the company and that industry are not encumbered by the myopic views that exist. I have changed companies and careers several times and I can speak from personal experience that my success was bringing a new and different perspective to the situation. In order for a company to continue to grow they must diversify. You are providing a very valuable alternative whether they recognize it or not. Be assertive and stand your ground. The company does not need to add another person who thinks like the herd. Of course the person you are interviewing is part of the herd so think thru your approach and don't offend people even though I know what you bring is a valuable addition to what they have.

25 January 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

Venkat Narayanan San Jose, CA

Hi Jim, The larger the company, the more likely you may compete with someone who is already established in the company you are interviewing with. This is not uncommon for a variety of reasons. HR is sometimes obliged to bring in outside candidates to interview just so they can show a pool of applicants had been interviewed while all along the intention was to hire the internal candidates. It will be hard for you to identify these practices up front. A best case scenario when not selected is to get feedback on why you did not get the position, sometimes there is a valid reason for going with an internal candidate who has a critical skill, even though you may be the better overall choice, because it reduces risk for the hiring manager. Don't let it get you down. Your best option is to continue to present your value in a compelling way and make a personal connection with the recruiter and/or the hiring manager. This is easier said than done. Best wishes in your job search. There are some excellent answers posted here, try not to worry too much about the factors outside your control.

25 January 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

Mary Beth Myford Fleetwood, PA

Thank you for your service. I hope that we (all who are answering) can provide some service to you.

I have worked for a few different companies in PA, and in all those companies we had the option to post internally or internally and externally. If there was a candidate we really wanted in a role, we posted internally for the minimum amount of time and then interviewed those we thought were qualified and then selected. It is in the company's best interest to do that, because why spend the energy/time/money evaluating outside candidates when there is no need.

For the positions we felt we didn't have the right experience inside, we posted externally. Quite frankly, if there is someone on the inside that can perform the role, it is better for morale and reduces the learning curve if we select them. But, if we posted externally, then there was a big question as to whether there was someone on the inside or we wondered if someone on the outside would bring more value.

How do you compete? Focus on your invaluable experience. Pick the job description apart and be able to explain everything you have done that meets their requirements. Be able to answer the question "Why do you want to work here?" with "because I have experience in ___, ___, and ___ and I am excited to bring that to your organization." Answer all questions with an example of what you have done and the benefit the company derived from it.

You can compete with anyone. The question is not can you compete, but how do you compete. Bring high energy and enthusiasm. Even if you don't get that job, there could be another job in that company for you.

If I can give you more, just ask.

24 January 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

Bob Stinchcum Americus, GA

Stay positive and don't mention that you have had a lot of other interviews but have not gotten the position. My answer to a question about your interviewing would be --yes I am interviewing a few companies that have a position that represents a challenge to me--------. Then talk about your experience that can make you more likely to succeed than someone --internal--without your broad experience.

24 January 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

Doug Hill Kearneysville, WV

And you are correct about calling in candidates just to show they met the EEOC requirements. I was a hiring manager and had to put job ads in 3 different newspapers even though I knew I was going to promote from within. And one of the three had to be a "minority" based newspaper. And I would have been glad to interview you, Master Chief, because I had to take time to interview some very unqualified applicants to satisfy the EEOC. Good Luck. I can take a look at your resume if you want. Glad to help another vet. And this is good advice, don't sit by the phone waiting for the call back. The more lines in the water, the better. Good Luck!

19 January 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

Doug Hill Kearneysville, WV

Jim,

Unfortunately, this is the nature of good company business to promote from within.Personnel already fit into the corporate culture. I don't know what field you are going after, but as a retired Master Chief, you have an incredible backlog of management skills. Have confidence that you can manage anything the civilian world can throw at you. I would recommend you broaden your job search to include government jobs. These are usually dependent on hiring outside contractors. The outside contractors such as Serco and Booz Allen Hamilton (I have no affiliation with these or any other government contractor) call in qualified candidates to fill the contracts. There are no personnel to promote from within. And the pay will be commensurate with experience. If I can be of any help, feel free to ask. Good Luck!

19 January 2016 Helpful answer

Advisor

michael convey Longboat Key, FL

Organizations that promote from within have a difficulty in expanding into new fields and are unable to develop new ideas to address problems and opportunities to grow their business. Your military background provides you with leadership skills that most employees in the private sector do not possess along with a strong ability to solve problems. Focus and communicate these thoughts to future employers, and try to distinguish your skills, experience and ability from that which a life long employee has.

mike convey

Advisor

Carrie Beyers Monroe, CT

Jim, You have many good answers already but I wanted to tell you that in my experience companies do not always post externally immediately. It may cost more if they use a recruiting service that charges a % of the salary for the external hire and internal hires may be a flat fee or no cost. If the company posts externally, it should be likely they are strongly considering an external hire. You won't always know you are losing out to an internal, could be a stronger external. It seems tough to "break into" a company but hopefully once you are there you will like it enough to stay and progress upward! Don't lose faith and thank you so much for your service!

Advisor

Larry Louwagie

Hey , iam an x sailor myself. Call me 503 705 5883 or email larry.louwagie@homevestors.com
we are the (We Buy Ugly Houses )

then get rid of the take charge pic, humble /relaxed is best.

Advisor

Mauri Okamoto-Kearney Los Altos, CA

Hi Jim- I just joined the group as an advisor and read through the great responses. I've found that what you're going through is no different than what those of us who move to a new area looking for a job face, so join the crowd! However, I'd like to point out that the most effective solution for getting on the 'inside' yourself is to network, network, network! As Eunice Chang recommended, you need to get there before any job description is posted. The way to do this is to list out and access all forms of community groups, military, high school, college, and all their splinter groups (professional associations to film appreciation groups). Contact and or go to a networking event, state what you're looking for and ask for help. Accept even an opportunity for an 'informational interview.' This is an interview with someone doing a job or working at a company or in an industry you're interested in. It's usually no longer than 30 mins in duration and you, the interviewee never asks for a job. Your intent is to find out all you can about the job this contact does, the company or industry, and finally to get at least 2 contacts to network with. Each info interview will lead to 2 more, and, if you can leave each interviewer/networking contact with a good sense for what you're looking for and what you're capable of, you will find out about positions they become aware of as an 'insider.' It's worked for me for over 28 years and has worked for everyone I've coached. Good luck!!

Advisor

Sarah Steele Fort Lauderdale, FL

Hi Jim,

This can be very frustrating. But see it as good interview practice. Being a good interviewee is a learned skill and the more you do, the better you will be. I also suggest asking how many internal candidates they are seeing so you can decide if you want to play. That isn't always a bad thing. If you can get hired by a firm that promotes from within, that can indicate good future prospects.

Finally, I hate to say it, but the 'we hired internally' can sometimes be a recruiters' lazy answer when they don't want to list all the reasons you weren't the right fit.

Good luck and stay positive!

Advisor

Karen Cavazos Wittmann, AZ

As a recruiter for a large financial company, I always approach each posting with one goal in mind - to place the most qualified candidate in the seat, regardless of whether they are internal or external. A lot has to do with the company culture, ours is focused heavily on internal development which is great for those that are ready for the next level. However, we don't always have ready talent and that moves us to post externally. I always recommend matching your skill with the qualifications and make sure to use key words in your resume that match the job description so you can be easily identified when recruiters are sourcing to fill their positions.

Advisor

Carl Legge West Chester, PA

Thank you so much for your service and I have one man's opinion to share. It would also help to interview with "veteran friendly" companies. Hiring managers may be incentivized to hire a diverse team. In my opinion, there are a lot of folks that want what's new and exciting, and someone on the outside may provide that. But one thing you have to understand is that folks from within need to be developed or they will leave, and if they want to retain that talent they have to hire from within a fair amount. I'm just overstating the obvious and is one of the disadvantages you knew would happen by staying in the service for 26 years. I wouldn't say it is nepotism solely, but internal candidates have a deep knowledge of the market and industry they are in and they can be considered more qualified for that particular position even against someone with 26 years of leadership experience. Just as you wouldn't put a 15 year business person into a battalion command, you wouldn't do the same the other way around. At least I wouldn't in my business. I know there are parallels believe me, but you just have to get over that people just don't understand what you've been doing for 26 years and you can never expect them to. I recommend picking the industry you want, then the company or companies you want in that industry, and choose sales (or something customer facing) as a way to get in. I chose that route as my profession out of the military because I thought it would give me the best way to earn a fair chance to perform and show my ability. It may be considered entry level but if you perform you can make a lot more money than in the military. Your leadership with your customers will be evident and it will make you really get noticed. You have retiree benefits so that's the direction I would go. If you're good you will be noticed and promoted into whatever function you want to follow thereafter: marketing, operations, IT, supply chain, etc. Good Luck!!

Advisor

Paul Smith Calistoga, CA

I sympathize with the angst. Like you, I was in competing with an internal candidate who had extensive experience in certain specific disciplines. I believe I was ultimately hired as a capital projects development manager because I had a broader, more general experience, an appreciation of what the job required immediately and a vision of what the position could (and did) ultimately evolve into. After I was hired it became clear that the company was also seeking fresh, out of the box concepts and ideas with which to expand their production facilities. In my case, management felt the internal candidates had become inbred and stagnant.

Advisor

Richard Filippi Rye, NY

Thank you for defending my family in your years of service.
All of these are very good reply's to your question and have a great deal of good advice. Many banks, like UBS, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan, etc. have programs seeking veterans, especially with leadership experience. If these banks have these programs, so do defense firms as well as general industrial firms. I am not certain if there is one web site with these companies listed, but each one has the program listed on the web site.
Best of Luck

Advisor

LaVera Caston Plano, TX

Hi Jim Williams,

Yes, this is the way of life in the US. Easy, Management, supervisory positions are highly needed. You have that! Let them know of your accomplishments and contributions. Some job hunters can help, but you pay for it.

Experteer.com

Advisor

kauffee chantel Sturgeon Bay, WI

I think that you are a smart guy and you bring a lot of qualities to the job. But sometimes you can be over qualified for survellian jobs and being the high ranking official that you are, some feel threatened and a since of competition. I think that you should let them know that you been in the military, talk about your job and job title if asked but leave the rank out unless asked ,because it intimidates some. Try not to elaborate on your self so much, give short answers to appear to be more interested in your new job

Advisor

Sandra Shelton Fort Worth, TX

I am so sorry you are finding this reality. The way I see it .... you have 2 choices. Live with it or ask on the front end, "How many internal prospects are you currently interviewing for this job?" Follow up question after they tell you (understand they may not), How often does your company hire from within? For example, in the last 3 hires, how many were internal candidates?
An ethical HR person will respect you and might just tell you the truth and save you some time.

Many companies don't realize that incest (so to speak) is not best.
Call if you want to chat further. I would be happy to talk further, particularly after you have tried the question strategy. 469 751 7774

Advisor

Daryl Diebold

Jim you have to build a narrative that begins by understanding what every hiring manager wants then transferring your skills and experiences into that story back to him/her. Managers all have three things (likable, competent, enthusiastic) they want in a new hire that you need to remind them of and it helps to point it out by speaking about the possible candidate as if they were someone other than you your referring to: "Jim if the ideal candidate were sitting right next to me he/she would be someone trustworthy that has the skills and experiences important to being successful from day to day but the enthusiasm to approach each moment with energy and personal responsibility essential to motivating others toward enjoying what they do...and we both know that's contagious right? Is that the kind of person you're looking for?" Also just ask the straight questions about if he/she is leaning toward internal candidates for reasons like time to effectiveness because of cultural or process acclimation.

Veteran

Justin Nichols Longview, TX

You have to network and build relationships with the decision maker before the job is even posted. Then stay in frequent communication with them. Most good jobs are filled before they are posted.

Advisor

Frank Pinto Las Vegas, NV

A Successful Job Search: It's All About Networking

Lots of good answers on here, and they are all (almost) wrong. Sorry, but a resume type job will not come from applications. Any job you find on line is flooded with applicants. If you want to find a job and you have defined skills, go to the watering hole of the employed!

Check out this link on NPR:

http://www.npr.org/2011/02/08/133474431/a-successful-job-search-its-all-about-networking

"At least 70 percent, if not 80 percent, of jobs are not published," he says. "And yet most people — they are spending 70 or 80 percent of their time surfing the net versus getting out there, talking to employers, taking some chances [and] realizing that the vast majority of hiring is friends and acquaintances hiring other trusted friends and acquaintances."

That personal connection is especially important now. With so many people applying for jobs, it's hard to get noticed.

Advisor

Kevin Spain Lafayette, LA

This can be a tough one! If the position your interviewing for is a Supervisory/Management slot, you can almost always expect that it come from within 75 percent of the time. Of course this is a retention tool, at this level the only way to combat this is to have very specific and direct experience to the position itself. At my company filling a position of leadership is frowned upon by employees if its filled with an external candidate. (Example: no one comes into the military as a E-7 or 0-5)

Advisor

Mark Hannah Incline Village, NV

Simple, don't play the stupid games with the herd and walk the leaders path, starting your own company...sales folks would love a small finders fee to match you with customers that will hire you for your deep knowledge, skills, and abilities at far much more an higher hourly rate. There is no reason with your experience and the right client you can't earn 3x more with tax benefits, etc. then convert to full time employee after your 6mo to 1 yr engagement if you'd like. Most senior level independent consultants gain strategic sensitive information they could potentially take to a competitor client, so you could be locked in for the right gig if you choose.
Again don't play the games, HR departments are a dying entity for many reasons, the debacle of incestuous nepotism is one of them which you're dealing with. I chose to take some risk and its been only rewarding. Hands-down I see more organizations with the blind leading the blind for the simple fact that a hiring managers personal "social" network was a priority over a professional "social" network resource being part of the team. A reason I enjoyed Silicon Valley companies was the merit-based ecosystem, e.g. you walk your talk and are a team player otherwise, next! Cheers and all the best, I'm on LinkedIn.

Advisor

Gerald Thomas Tulsa, OK

Jim

That is difficult task to accomplish. I am not sure why they don't vet internal candidates before the go externally. MSC Industrial look internally then if we don't have candidates we go externally. Although your service speaks for itself the internal candidate has the benefit of the company already knowing what they have and if this candidates performance is good and they have the background and training for the job they are applying a external candidate will more often than not be a alternate.

See our website at www.mscdirect.com to see if we have any positions you may be interested.

Advisor

Evelyn Torres Fort Smith, AR

Jim,

My name is Evelyn Torres and I’m a Corporate Recruiter for ArcBest Corporation. I’ve seen this happen a number of times but I will say… As a recruiter our job is to bring the most qualified candidates to the table. There are many benefits for promoting internal candidates such as prior company knowledge and culture fit. However, there are also many (many) upsides of bringing someone from outside the corporation, fresh set of eyes, new ideas, etc.

My suggestion to you is to keep trying! If the position is posted on an external board (such as LinkedIn, Monster, CareerBuilder) most of the time you’ll find the recruiter’s contact information. Shoot them an email and let them know that you’re interested and how your credentials align with this role. Additionally, let them know why you would be an asset to the company and why you desire to work there. When candidates make it a point to personally reach out, they definitely stand part in my mind.
Look luck with your job search!

Evelyn Torres
Etorres@arcb.com

Advisor

Mary Beth Myford Fleetwood, PA

Thank you for your service. I hope that we (all who are answering) can provide some service to you.

I have worked for a few different companies in PA, and in all those companies we had the option to post internally or internally and externally. If there was a candidate we really wanted in a role, we posted internally for the minimum amount of time and then interviewed those we thought were qualified and then selected. It is in the company's best interest to do that, because why spend the energy/time/money evaluating outside candidates when there is no need.

For the positions we felt we didn't have the right experience inside, we posted externally. Quite frankly, if there is someone on the inside that can perform the role, it is better for morale and reduces the learning curve if we select them. But, if we posted externally, then there was a big question as to whether there was someone on the inside or we wondered if someone on the outside would bring more value.

How do you compete? Focus on your invaluable experience. Pick the job description apart and be able to explain everything you have done that meets their requirements. Be able to answer the question "Why do you want to work here?" with "because I have experience in ___, ___, and ___ and I am excited to bring that to your organization." Answer all questions with an example of what you have done and the benefit the company derived from it.

You can compete with anyone. The question is not can you compete, but how do you compete. Bring high energy and enthusiasm. Even if you don't get that job, there could be another job in that company for you.

If I can give you more, just ask.

Advisor

GERRY KIRKLAND Fort Mill, SC

I suggest Enterprise Car Rental. They require a college degree and are hiring on a constant basis almost nationwide.

It is difficult to judge the unprofessional companies that interview to meet an internal policy requirement. When you see that happening run away from that company.

Advisor

Dana Bobko Jupiter, FL

AT&T does not bring in external candidates just to validate that they had the best internal candidates to begin with. If there is an available requisition that is publicly shown on the job site, then it has likely already been offered internally (sometimes they go straight to external at the managers discretion).

My situation was the opposite: I beat out the internal candidates when I secured my position.

Here is the job site specifically for veterans: http://att.jobs/doing-great-things/military

Best wishes,
Dana

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